Mon River Trails in Morgantown, W.Va. a Great Adventure on National Trails Day

Posted 05/31/12 by Rails-to-Trails Conservancy in America's Trails, Trail Use | Tagged with Community Events, West Virginia

Photo of Mon River Trails © NTEC

West Virginia knows how to celebrate National Trails Day. We might have to rename the Mountain State the Throw A Great Party On Your Local Rail-Trail State.

For those of you who can't make it down to Pocahontas County for the induction of the Greenbrier River Trail into Rails-to-Trails Conservancy's Rail-Trail Hall of Fame this Saturday, there's a very cool community event happening farther north in Morgantown.

The Mon River Trails Conservancy is celebrating National Trails Day with the 12th annual Deckers Creek Trail Half Marathon. Already record numbers have signed up to take part, with more than 550 runners expected to run from Masontown to Morgantown on Saturday, June 2. 

Runners will be coming in from 17 states, D.C. and the Virgin Islands to enjoy the mostly downhill course on the Deckers Creek rail-trail.

There aren't many spots left to join the race, but all are still welcome to come along and enjoy the festivities at Hazel Ruby McQuain. Like Bluegrass music? Of course you do. At race headquarters in Hazel Ruby McQuain Park on the Monongahela River in downtown Morgantown, there will be live local bluegrass from 10:15 a.m. to 12:50 p.m., including a set by the Halftime String Band (below).

Photo of the Halftime String Band © Halftime String Band

While you're in the area, take advantage of the opportunity to explore the wonderful Mon River Trails. Made possible by a grant through the federal Transportation Enhancements program, this 48-mile trail system along a former CSX railway corridor offers great opportunities for birding, fishing, swimming, picnicking, canoeing and kayaking, and is now one of the most popular tourist draws in this region of great natural beauty.

For more information on this Saturday's event and the Mon River Trails Conservancy, visit www.montrails.org

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